Generation Z

We keep hearing about Millennials, but what about the generation after them? With “Generation Z” being loosely defined as the generation that currently has its oldest members in their early 20s, the NY Post reports:

“Gen Z actually like and trust their parents, who have been transparent with them, much more than any generation before,” said Jeff Brauer, a political science professor at Keystone College in suburban Scranton, Pa., who has produced one of the first comprehensive studies on the next generation.

Analyzing research from Wright State University in Ohio on 1,200 Generation Z students at 15 colleges and universities across the country, Brauer also used exit polling from CNN and census data to draw his conclusions.

“They are not as impressed with fame — celebrities, athletes, politicians — as are their predecessors, since fame in their lifetime has become rather easy to obtain with social media and reality TV,” Brauer added.

Generation Z is diverse. They are only 55 percent white and will be the last majority-white generation in America. And they have the most positive outlook toward the nation’s growing diversity of any previous generation.


Generation Z is a product of 9/11, global terrorism, school shootings, perpetual wars, the Great Recession, high unemployment and constant budget cuts. Because of all that, they are cautious, even fearful, of an uncertain world and economy. Security and safety are very important to them, as they have grown up in such an unstable society.

They are distrustful of “big” employers because they’ve seen good people, who did all the right things, get laid off from longstanding jobs and careers. They are cautious with finances, always looking for the best deals and the best value.

Regarding their ‘politics’ (which may be better construed as general values, as they are largely too young to form informed political opinions):

“Politically, Generation Z is liberal-moderate with social issues, like support for marriage equality and civil rights, and moderate-conservative with fiscal and security issues,” said Brauer.

“While many are not connected to the two major parties and lean independent, Gen Z’s inclinations generally fit moderate Republicans.”

I suppose ‘moderate Republican’ is better than full blown SJW.

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